• Publisher’s Message
  • Contributors
  • Poetry
  • Fiction
  • Non-Fiction
  • Galleries
  • Archive
  • The Art of Self-Soothing

     

    He thinks he’s a healer—says optimism is low risk. He provides pastoral care to the emotionally conflicted when no one asks him to…when no one wants him to. He says he likes women with tongues that move indiscriminately—a woman unafraid to chew with her mouth open. He studies how she wipes away lipstick with fingers as long as incense; nails dipped in gold; hands so soft they might as well be wet. He methodically traces veins reflecting tinged with suicidal ideation; with making you need me; with knowing you don’t want me; all cased in a brown much like his own.

     

    I must have been beautiful to watch.

     
     

    A poet, he is. He writes on mothers favored like Peter; on fathers transformed like Paul. He manipulates activism with ass shaking; uses metaphor to disguise promises he can’t keep. He writes on sons tangled between nigga and nice; intellectual and homeboy; hood mentality and higher education; to follow Jesus or dreams. He doesn’t write about the mornings my curls padded the dip of his back; how we discovered intimacy in silence; the moment I opened my heart to him when he didn’t ask me to…when he didn’t want me to. His poems never tell of his use of me as a self-soothing tactic; about how hard I fought to silence voices screaming obscenities in his psyche; how I built his comfort at the expense of my own; how our resemblances swindled him into thinking he could treat me the way he treats himself…

     

    Optimism isn’t low risk—loving him isn’t either.
     
     
     

    *****

    Womanhood

     

    From popped cherries to soiled panties,
     

    to unwelcome touches and unwanted pregnancies—
     

    from busted bodies to bruised spirits and plenty of
     

    he said he loved me’s.
     

    To become a woman,
     

    why must a girl always bleed?

     

    About The Author

    Bridgette 1

    Bridgette D. Jordan

    Bridgette D. Jordan is a multi-disciplinary artist from Southfield, Michigan. She has been seen both on and off stage as an actor, director, singer, performance artist, and writer.  She holds a BFA in Theatre Performance and recently received her MA in English from her undergraduate institution, Wayne State University. Current and forthcoming publications include Rigorous and Public Poetry. aaduna plans to welcome her non-fiction writing in a forthcoming 2018 issue.